Science & Research

West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission

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Scientist Spotlight

13th
March

SCIENTIST SPOTLIGHT: TIMOTHY CORRIGAN

featured, News about science and research, Scientist Spotlight, The Neuron – West Virginia Journal of Science and Research

T.-Corrigan-and-student

The big picture of Dr. Tim Corrigan’s field of research starts with the very small. Most of what he does is on the nanoscale, in fact. A great deal of Corrigan’s materials science engineering research at Concord University was originally inspired by the events surrounding the attack on America on Sept. 11, 2001. While on the research faculty at the University of Maryland, Corrigan was tasked with research, funded by the National Security Administration (NSA) that could improve the signal of biosensors in response to the fear of biological warfare. If the signal on the biosensors could be improved, then scientists would have the ability to determine if there was a deadly substance in the air.

While his research was eventually halted by the NSA at the time, Corrigan is now in southern West Virginia and giving Concord’s students the research opportunity of a lifetime by continuing the work.

Corrigan and his students are working to attach quantum dots to a gold nanoparticle-DNA origami template to increase the light coming out of the quantum dot.  The gold nanoparticles act like nano-antennas for the light, and the DNA origami allows the quantum dots and gold nanoparticles to be placed in specific positions with nano-size control.

Corrigan said that potential future applications of his research could include improved bioassays, solar cells or optical circuits. In the meantime, Corrigan has a goal that isn’t on the nanoscale. He wants to inspire, motivate and encourage students.

Read more about Corrigan’s background, accomplishments and research in the Winter 2015 of the Neuron.

To read about other West Virginia scientists who have been spotlighted in The Neuron, visit the Neuron page of the Library for past issues.

If you’d like to be added to mailing list for the print issue of The Neuron, email Editor Amanda Ramey at amanda.ramey@wvresearch.org.

 

 

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17th
November

SCIENTIST SPOTLIGHT: DR. MARCIA HARRISON

featured, Scientist Spotlight, The Neuron – West Virginia Journal of Science and Research

Harrison-and-students It could be said that Marshall University’s Dr. Marcia Harrison digs a little deeper. Harrison is a professor in Marshall’s Department of Biological Sciences, and she keeps a close watch on exactly how plants grow.

Harrison said, “When plants fall down they can’t get up – at least not right away.”

Harrison’s research career has revolved around how plants respond to gravity and interaction of other factors – including space.

Read more about Harrison’s research in the Fall 2014 edition of The Neuron.

To read about other West Virginia scientists who have been spotlighted in The Neuron, visit the Neuron page of the Library for past issues.

If you’d like to be added to mailing list for the print issue of The Neuron, email Editor Amanda Ramey at amanda.ramey@wvresearch.org.

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8th
August

SCIENTIST SPOTLIGHT: DR. SHER HENDRICKSON-LAMBERT

featured, Scientist Spotlight, The Neuron – West Virginia Journal of Science and Research

Sher-and-studentSher Hendrickson-Lambert has studied condors, taught about conservation in South Africa and helped round up wild horses in Ecuador. It sounds like a pretty diverse life, but the common denominator for the assistant professor of biology at Shepherd University is a passion for genetic research and evolutionary biology.

Read more about Hendrickson-Lambert’s research interests in the Summer 2014 edition of the Neuron.

To read about other West Virginia scientists who have been spotlighted in The Neuron, visit the Neuron page of the Library for past issues.

If you’d like to be added to mailing list for the print issue of The Neuron, email Editor Amanda Ramey at amanda.ramey@wvresearch.org.

 

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7th
May

SCIENTIST SPOTLIGHT: DR. BRIAN ANDERSON

featured, Scientist Spotlight, The Neuron – West Virginia Journal of Science and Research

B-ANDERSON&studentBrian Anderson says that West Virginia University is an unearthed gem in the world of energy research – and he has good authority to make that statement. The WVU associate professor was nominated last year by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). As reported in last quarter’s The Neuron, Anderson was selected for the prestigious award – which is the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. Government upon science and engineering professionals in the early stages of their independent research careers.

Anderson’s research is well-timed for the state of West Virginia, the country and the world. The thrust of his work is in the areas of natural gas hydrates, thermodynamic modeling and sustainable energy and development in the area of geothermal systems.

When asked to sum up his ambition Anderson said, “My ultimate goal is to find more viable indigenous energy sources. I want to leave a mark and show the world how great our state is.”

Read more about Anderson’s background, accomplishments and research in the Spring 2014 edition of the Neuron.

To read about other West Virginia scientists who have been spotlighted in The Neuron, visit the Neuron page of the Library for past issues.

If you’d like to be added to mailing list for the print issue of The Neuron, email Editor Amanda Ramey at amanda.ramey@wvresearch.org.

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25th
February

SCIENTIST SPOTLIGHT: DR. ANDREW NICHOLS

featured, News about science and research, Scientist Spotlight, The Neuron – West Virginia Journal of Science and Research

Dr. Andrew Nichols loved hunting and fishing as a child growing up in Point Pleasant, West Virginia.  His fascination with Legos and enjoyment of math and science naturally set him on a path to become an engineer.  It was at Purdue University where he was pursuing his Master’s and Doctorate Degrees in civil engineering that Nichols found out that traffic engineering was a great fit for him.

A.Nichols&StudentWhile at Purdue, Nichols worked in a traffic lab which he credits with giving him invaluable hands-on experience with traffic signals to complement what he was learning in the classroom. He developed skills that allow him to not only use software in the office to study traffic patterns and design traffic signal timings, but he also learned how to program actual traffic signal controllers that are installed at all intersections – expertise, he said, that very few practicing traffic engineers have.

The research he is doing right now as an associate professor of engineering at Marshall University is funded by the West Virginia Department of Transportation (WVDOT).  His research promotes ways to make West Virginia roads and intersections safer and more efficient. He conducts research in conjunction with the Nick J. Rahall Appalachian Transportation Institute (RTI) at Marshall University – a leader in multimodal transportation and economic development in West Virginia and the Appalachian Region.

Read more about Dr. Nichols’ accomplishments and research in the Winter 2014 edition of the Neuron.

 

Continued reading
If you’re visiting this page because you wanted to learn more about Dr. Nichols after reading your copy of the Neuron, click here.

 

To read about other West Virginia researchers featured in the Neuron, visit the Neuron page of the Library.

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16th
December

SCIENTIST SPOTLIGHT: DR. NICK WU

featured, News about science and research, Scientist Spotlight, The Neuron – West Virginia Journal of Science and Research

 

N.-Wu-and-studentIt’s a wonderful life according to Dr. Nianqiang “Nick” Wu, associate professor in West Virginia University’s Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Not only is his research cutting edge and gaining international attention, he is also an inspiration to his students and, perhaps most importantly, he sincerely loves his work.

He said, “People do what they enjoy in life, and I really love research.”

Wu, who was born in southern China, said he has always known he wanted to be a scientist. His path to West Virginia started when he did his post-doctoral research at the University of Pittsburgh so he was already familiar with the area when the opportunity to join the ranks at WVU came about.

Read more about Nick Wu’s accomplishments and research in nanotechnology at WVU in the Fall 2013 edition of the Neuron.

To read about other West Virginia researchers featured in the Neuron, visit the Neuron page of the Library.

 

 

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7th
August

Scientist Spotlight: Dr. Barbara Liedl

featured, News about science and research, Scientist Spotlight, The Neuron – West Virginia Journal of Science and Research

B.-liedlThe associate research professor at West Virginia State University is well known around the Gus R. Douglass Institute for the varieties of tomatoes she and her students cultivate. Bell peppers and chili peppers are another frequent harvest, and this year artichokes are among the crops growing in the garden.

She and her students cross certain plants with others and study the DNA, working to find specific genetic traits to develop strains that will resist disease, resist insects or grow better in certain conditions, such as in a greenhouse or high tunnel instead of an outdoor garden.

Read more about Dr. Liedl’s program at West Virginia State University in the Summer 2013 edition of the Neuron (pdf).

Photo by John Sibold.

 

To read about other West Virginia researchers featured in past issues of the Neuron, visit the Neuron page of the Library.

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10th
June

Scientist Spotlight: Dr. Charlie Chen

Discoveries, featured, Scientist Spotlight

chen-and-studentsDr. Yi Charlie Chen considers himself a fortunate man.

And why wouldn’t he? The professor of biology and prolific researcher at Alderson-Broaddus College in Philippi is living his dream. As a teacher, researcher, husband and father, he has accomplished every goal in life he has set so far. 

His next goal: sustaining the level of research he’s helped create at the 800-student private college in the north-central West Virginia.

Read more about Dr. Chen’s accomplishments and research in the Spring 2013 edition of the Neuron.

To read about other West Virginia researchers featured in the Neuron, visit the Neuron page of the Library.

Photo by John Sibold.

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4th
April

Scientist spotlight: Dr. Bin Wang

featured, News about science and research, Scientist Spotlight, The Neuron – West Virginia Journal of Science and Research

wangDr. Bin Wang has traveled far in her young career, both geographically and professionally. As assistant professor of Chemistry at Marshall University, she lives 6,000 miles from her native Beijing. As an academic, she’s contributed to substantial research at Queen’s University in Ontario, University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, and Marshall.

Her first book, RNA Nanotechnology, is due out later this year.

Read more about Dr. Wang’s accomplishments and future plans in the Winter 2013 edition of the Neuron.

To read about other West Virginia researchers featured in the Neuron, visit the Neuron page of the Library .

 

Photo by John Sibold

 

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22nd
April

Scientist Spotlights

Scientist Spotlight

Dr. Barbar Liedl, The associate research professor at West Virginia State University is well known around the Gus R. Douglass Institute for the varieties of tomatoes she and her students cultivate. Bell peppers and chili peppers are another frequent harvest, and this year artichokes are among the crops growing in the garden. Read Scientist Spotlight.

Dr. Yi Charlie Chen considers himself a fortunate man. And why wouldn’t he? The professor of biology and prolific researcher at Alderson-Broaddus College in Philippi is living his dream. As a teacher, researcher, husband and father, he has accomplished every goal in life he has set so far. Read Scientist Spotlight.

Dr. Bin Wang has traveled far in her young career, both geographically and professionally. As assistant professor of Chemistry at Marshall University, she lives 6,000 miles from her native Beijing. As an academic, she’s contributed to substantial research at Queen’s University in Ontario, University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, and Marshall. Read Scientist Spotlight.

Jeremy Dawson is watching you. He sees your facial structure, your irises, your gait and your movements. he records those traits and recognizes them later. Read Scientist Spotlight.

Dr. Joe Allen has lead some 75 students and 75 professional geologist on study trips to the Rocky Mountain Region where two ancient earthquake faults are exposed. Read Scientist Spotlight.

For Dr. Michael Norton, the path is important. Recalling the attention the he received as an undergraduate student, he passes that same philosophy on to inspire his students. Read Scientist Spotlight.

Dr. Cerasela Zoica Dinu is making a difference in education and research in West Virginia. While conducting groundbreaking research in nanoscience, she’s stimulating her students to be critical thinkers.  Read Scientist Spotlight.

Dr. Bryan Raudenbush applies common scents to his research. Literally. He is studying the under-researched area of scent and odors and their affect on human performance. He is also an outstanding faculty mentor. Read Scientist Spotlight.

Dr. Brian Antonsen wants to give kids a different view of scientists than what they see on television. That’s why he directs the annual Brain Expo. Read about that work, and his research on how social experience influence brain development. Read Scientist Spotlight.

Dr. Maura McLaughlin‘s astronomical search for gravitational waves involves teenage students from the community near Green Bank, W. Va. Dr. McLaughlin tries to show kids that scientists are real people too.  Read Scientist Spotlight.

Dr. Tina Cartwright is a firm believer in undergraduate research, but the colleges and universities need a supply of students qualified in STEM fields. Read how she is working to improve eduction in science, technology, engineering and math teaching at the grade school level.  Read Scientist Spotlight.

Dr. Xiadong ‘Mike’ Shi is researching compounds that may revolutionize health care and bio-sensor industries. He has received an NSF CAREER award in support of junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars. Read Scientist Spotlight.

Dr. Tony Szwilski directs a Marshall University visualization lab that is a real asset for coal-mine safety, among other uses. Learn how the visualization lab and the CEGAS center generate economic development.  Read Scientist Spotlight.

Dr. Jason Best is known for his energetic style in the classroom. Outside of the classroom, he directs the Shepherd University Observatory that enhances the classroom experience. Read how he involves the community in learning about astronomy. Read Scientist Spotlight.

Dr. Letha Sooter is working to develop sensors for the U.S. Military to use to detect and identify potential threats to soldiers and civilians. Read how this research may lead to common household products that prevent food poisoning. Read Scientist Spotlight.

Dr. Bin Wang has traveled far in her young career, both geographically and professionally. Read Scientist Spotlight.

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